Care for wild animals in distress

The ball of juvenile animals in trouble update

The ball of juvenile animals in trouble

In April and May 2024, we came to the aid of335 wild animals, still an average of 5 animals every day, via our telephone mediation service.
With the breeding season in full swing, we were much in demand to help juveniles or even fledglings, particularly among nocturnal raptors. In April, we were contacted for no less than 16 owls including tawny owls, barn owls and an Athena's owl.
Fledglings fallen from the nest, emancipating juveniles, intentional or accidental nest destruction, nest disturbance, domestic predation, etc.... This is the period of vulnerability for the animals, the period of peak activity for our association and all wildlife care centers.
So we guided people through a non-intrusive in situ intervention. Because putting the young back in the nest, or creating a substitute nest to replace one that has been damaged or is unreachable, is beneficial to animals in distress. A carer, however experienced, can never replace the parent of an animal for which we humans don't have the learning codes.
To understand the damage caused by our activities such as gardening and road traffic and reduce their impact, we'll be running an online training session "Les Bons Gestes : What to do when faced with a wild animal in distress?" on June 27, 2024 at 6pm. Registrationis already open, go to here to take your place

Gulls persecuted on the roads update

Gulls persecuted on the roads

In March 2024, we came to the aid of 76 wild animals, still an average of 2 animals every day, via our telephone mediation service.
Spring is slow to set in, even though the month's temperatures were very warm for a month of March. So, births have begun, notably among pigeons and turtle-doves, overtaken by squirrels and hedgehogs.
But in March, it was mainly cases of collisions with cars, in town, that allarmed us. We received 9 calls about seagulls injured on the road, mostly broken wings.
The significant presence of these seabirds in an urban environment, in this case in Lorient and the surrounding area, leads to regular contact with us humans. Our vigilance is required, as our daily activities have a real and disastrous impact even though the breeding season has not yet begun.
To understand the damage caused by our activities such as urbanization and land artificialisation, and to reduce their impact such as that of our vehicles, we will be running the 3rd online training session "Les Bons Gestes : What to do when faced with a wild animal in distress?" on April 25, 2024 at 6pm. Registrationsare already open, go to here to take your place

Trapped owls and exhausted guillemots update

Trapped owls and exhausted guillemots

Since January 1, 2024, we have helped112 wild animals, or 2 animals every day (on average) via our telephone mediation service.
January and February are the last months of the off-season for Trisk'ailes, and we can already feel activity starting to pick up in recent days.
And here are two causes of distress that have particularly struck us at the start of the year.
First, the owls found trapped in the chimney flues of private individuals. At this time of year, when chimneys are still in operation or have just been turned off, the birds of prey that choose to take up residence there are discovered covered in soot. In such cases, they need to be taken in for cleaning, particularly of their eyes.
The second highlight wasthe stormy period that forced the common guillemots to deviate from their flight and land due to fatigue. Lacking rest, malnourished and dehydrated, a dozen of these seabirds were found flat on Brittany's beaches.
To limit the damage caused by our activities as well as those of our chimneys, and to protect as many people as possible when faced with an animal in distress, we ran the second online training session "Les Bons Gestes : What to do when faced with a wild animal in distress" on February 29 to 6 people. The next session will take place on April 25, 2024 and registrations are already open

1923 wild animals helped since January update

1923 wild animals helped since January

Since the beginning of the year, we have helped5 wild animals every day (on average) via our telephone mediation service.
In October, we entered the off-season with a slowdown in mediation activity, as every year.
However, we went through a storm period that impacted wildlife.  We received calls for at least 13 birds - of which 2/3 were seabirds - that suffered from the weather in November and into early December.
Penguins, Gannets, Common Murres, Great Egrets and Little Egrets, Wood Pigeons and Turtle Doves...

In November, we were also able to display our exhibition "Rehabilitating the image of the gull" at the Université Bretagne Sud in Lorient for 2 weeks, to restore this unloved protected species to its place in the ecosystem. Another way of taking action that is important and complementary to mediation.
Find the November balance sheet on instagram

We've helped 1,455 wild animals in 5 months! update

We've helped 1,455 wild animals in 5 months!

Since the arrival of Trisk'ailes in the Captain Cause catalog, our team of enthusiasts has not been idle!
Since April 1, we have helped10 wild animals every day (on average).
In June - a month later than in 2022 - we reached the annual peak of activity alone representing 30% of the solicitations received for birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians in distress in the Breton area and beyond.
The European hedgehog remains the species most concerned. Victims of diseases and parasites due to their weakened immune systems, unearthed while gardening, knocked down on the roads, trapped in our infrastructures or even predated by our pets...
Find the June balance sheet on instagram.

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