An innovation to transform plastic waste into a source of energy

Crushed fishing traps! update

Crushed fishing traps!

We told you about it last time: we've received a parcel from Kerkennah! Indeed, the fishermen of this Tunisian island, often unaware of the impact of plastic pollution on marine biodiversity, abandon their plastic traps at the bottom of the Mediterranean. 
The objective? To ensure that our Chrysalis is compatible with this source of plastic, and to organize upstream collection. Over the last few weeks, our teams have been crushing the traps.

A package from Kerkennah! update

A package from Kerkennah!

While we're waiting for the Chrysalis to be installed on Kerkennah Island, we're continuing our tests on fishing traps. In fact, a parcel containing samples of plastic waste from Tunisia should soon be arriving in our workshop. The aim? To encourage fishermen to take their fishing nets out of the Mediterranean and recycle them into energy that can be used directly in their boats. 

A visit to Kerkennah! update

A visit to Kerkennah!

Accompanied by our partner SMILO, part of the Earthwake team was in Tunisia last June to follow the progress of the Plast'île project. One of the objectives of this project is the installation of a Chrysalis on Kerkennah Island to recycle plastic fishing traps abandoned at sea.

The program for the trip included a visit to the potential site for the machine in partnership, a tour of the ANGED shredding site, an outing at sea with fishermen's representatives, a meeting with the Island Committee and participation in a beach clean-up event at Ramla.

Pyrolysis tests on plastic fishing traps! update

Pyrolysis tests on plastic fishing traps!

The installation of a Chrysalis on the Kerkennah islands in Tunisia is intended to find solutions to the problem of abandoning plastic fishing traps at sea. Indeed, fishing is at the heart of island life in Kerkennah: more than two-thirds of the population currently earn their living from marine activities. There are an estimated 2,500 fishermen on the island.

Thanks to your support, we have carried out pyrolysis tests on plastic fishing traps that have been in the Mediterranean. These tests were very conclusive, demonstrating the compatibility of this waste with our Chrysalis equipment.

Thank you again for your mobilization, particularly as part of the #UnCadeauPourLaTerre operation.

Chrysalis production for Kerkennah is progressing well! updateChrysalis container production for Kerkennah underway

Chrysalis production for Kerkennah is progressing well!

We want to install a Chrysalis in Kerkennah, Tunisia, to convert plastic fishing traps abandoned at sea into energy that can be used directly by fishing boats. Thanks to your support, we are making progress on manufacturing the equipment in our Vaucluse workshop. The Chrysalis will comprise two containers: one for pyrolysis of plastic waste that is difficult to recycle, and one for fuel storage and reclamation. 

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