An ecological corridor to restore Africa's equatorial forest

Floods in Burundi, our nurseries hit! updateBurundi, victim of the rising waters of Lake Tanganyika

Floods in Burundi, our nurseries hit!

Successive floods hit our activities during November, December and January. 

The nursery managed by the Jane Goodall Institute France, thanks to your invaluable support, was partially washed away by the overflow of the small Gasango river in the commune of Rumonge.

Thanks to a natural barrier on this river, the majority of the bags were laid down by the torrent and not washed away. We were able to recover and restore them. Nevertheless, around 3,000 of the nursery's 20,000 trees were completely washed away.

On the other hand, further south, in the commune of Nyanza, not far from the border with Tanzania, on the edge of the chimpanzee ecological corridor, a second nursery with 30,000 trees was completely washed away by the overflowing Mushara River. Unfortunately, only around 50 trees were able to recover.

These floods have caused a great deal of damage: to homes, crops, road infrastructure.

Unfortunately, scientists' predictions say that the waters of Lake Tanganyika will reach their highest level in May 2024.

But with the hope of a fairer world for people, animals and nature, we're not giving up!

Thank you for your support dear Captains, thanks to you, our team on the ground has been able to repair the damage of these floods and will be able to ensure the continuity of our action on the ground!!

Together, we can.
Together, we will succeed! 

335,000 trees in our nursery! update

335,000 trees in our nursery!

The materialization of the limits of the last chimpanzee habitats in southern Burundi constituting their ecological connectivity continues. 

Communities maintain nurseries for the production of indigenous trees: so far we are producing 335,000 indigenous trees. 30,000 of these are thanks to the direct support of the Jane Goodall Institute France.

These trees will be used to restore degraded habitats and agricultural plots. Communities are also organizing forest patrol activities to discourage illegal tree-cutting and animal-hunting activities.

Thank you Captains, all this is possible thanks to your support! 

The project is taking shape! update

The project is taking shape!

Consultations with local communities and scientists have determined which species will be planted:

- Maesopsis eminii
- Markhamia lutea
- Ficus sp
- Anisophyllea
- Syzygium guineensis

And this on the localities of Nyazalac and Mabanda initially.

What a joy to see this project come to fruition thanks to you! Thank you Captains!

Thanks to the first Captains! update

Thanks to the first Captains!

Hello,

Our ambitious ecological corridor project is coming to fruition as planned.

Thanks to the support of the first Captains, nearly 33 hectares of forest will be able to be restored in Burundi! 
Sincerely, thank you!!

As the project has been validated by the country's national authorities, we are currently in contact with the authorities in the various districts to select the best species to sow and plant.

Local populations are indeed at the heart of this project; People, animals and our environment: everything is interconnected!

We look forward to coming back to you with great news to share!
See you soon,
Asante sana!!

The Jane Goodall Institute France team

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